Asheville Angel Pets Conference April 26, 2014
Friday, Mar. 7th 2014 4:14 PM

ATT0000444Please join me and other presenters at the Angel Pets Conference

in Asheville, NC on Saturday April 26, 2014 from 9am to 5pm.

This one-day conference covers many topics on animal companion end-of-life care to help us become more knowledgeable and comfortable with this difficult but inevitable time in our animals’ lives. We all want to lovingly care for our companions during this critical time, but we do not always know how. This conference sets out to explore these issues in an informative, lighthearted and fun way. Time will be allotted for Q&A with every presentation and an expert panel discussion is included at the end.

The conference will cover the medical, practical, emotional & spiritual considerations of caring for animal companions at the end of their lives.

The goal of this conference is to allow individuals to come away feeling comforted by the knowledge of what to expect and to be equipped with the resources to help navigate this challenging and honorable last phase of our companion animals’ lives.

Speakers include local area veterinarians, bereavement specialists, and myself as the animal communicator. Topics:

  • Assessing Qualities of Life in Companion Animals
  • Medical Advocacy: Talking with Your Veterinarian About End of Life Care
  • Reiki for Pet End of Life and Transition
  • Understanding Animal Companion Hospice Care
  • Before, During and After the Euthanasia Process
  • The Value of Animal Communication
  • Coping with the Grief of Pet Loss
  • Essential Oils and Essences
  • Panel Discussion Q&A

Vendor area free to public during the conference.

Four Points Sheraton, 22 Woodfin Street, Asheville, NC. Early registration (before April 1) $50; $65 after; Lunch buffet included.

To register or for more information, please visit: www.AngelPetsConference.com

 

Horses Help People Heal
Friday, Oct. 4th 2013 2:33 PM

equinection - screen shot

Horses are authentic teachers who can help people understand themselves more deeply. By being present with these majestic creatures, there is an opportunity to learn the delicate dance of building relationships. Fears and uncertainty may rise to the surface providing fertile ground for healing. Learning to pay attention and engaging in respectful  interaction fosters connection and love.

A few years ago, I was invited to Equinection, a farm near Burnsville, North Carolina, where equine facilitated learning and therapy programs are offered. The director and founder, Karen Head, is a gentle, compassionate and extraordinary teacher. My time with her and the horses was transformative and profound.

If you would like to learn more about equine facilitated learning (EFL),  equine facilitated therapy (EFT), or the programs at Equinection, please visit their website at www.equinection.org or click here to view their video.

 

Animal Communication Tip – Let Your Animal Know About A Visit To The Vet
Friday, Aug. 30th 2013 10:12 AM

When you need to take your animal companion to the vet, it is helpful to let them know what the experience will be.

My dog Syra used to love to go the vet because she got treats and was fawned on by the entire staff. A few pokes and prods was nothing to Syra amidst all of the loving and attention. My cats, on the other hand, have never looked forward to a vet visit.  Each animal’s nature is different. Whether your companion is relaxed or tense about vet visits, consider conveying what they can expect during the appointment prior to going.

Offer a description: “First they will weigh you, then the vet will check your heart, ears and teeth and then we will come home together.” Visualize the experience and calmly send that image to your animal. Remember that animals sense our emotions and energy so be sure you are feeling calm when you transmit a message to your furry friend. Give some thought to your choice of words and hold the image in your mind as you relay the message.

Clear and loving communication lays the foundation for a successful experience.

 

Cows Love Music Too
Friday, Jul. 12th 2013 9:22 AM

Jazz for cows!

A jazz band plays music for cows in this amusing short video:  http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/lXKDu6cdXLI?rel=0

Sure to bring a smile to your face. Enjoy and share!

Posted by Rain Hummingbird | in Fun Animal Photos and Videos |

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Today Is A Gift; That’s Why They Call It The Present
Friday, Jun. 21st 2013 6:33 AM

539137_10150965497706426_1128686074_nMany people will walk in and out of your life, but only true friends will leave footprints on your heart. To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart. Anger is only one letter short of danger. If someone betrays you once, it is his fault; if he betrays you twice, it is your fault. Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people. He who loses money loses much; he who loses a friend loses much more; he who loses faith loses all. Beautiful young people are accidents of nature but beautiful old people are works of art. Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself. There is no beginning or end. Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is mystery. Today is a gift; that’s why they call it the present.

(original author unknown)

Happy Summer Solstice!

Posted by Rain Hummingbird | in Inspiration for You, Uncategorized |

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Animal Communication Tip – Communicate The Behavior You Want
Saturday, Jun. 8th 2013 5:33 AM

dog sitting

When you communicate with your animal companions, it is important to communicate the desired behavior and not phrase or project the negative.

Animals pick up on the energy of our communications as much as they do our words and imagery. So when you communicate a message to your animal companion, relay your message in a positive manner and align your emotions with what you are communicating.

Here’s an example. If you would like your dog to greet a guest respectfully, say: “Sally is visiting today and I would like you to greet her in a friendly and gentle manner”. Visualize in your mind that your dog greets Sally calmly and then transmit that image to your dog. This message is a lot different than feeling frustrated and saying: “Don’t jump on Sally when she visits today.” What your dog will ‘hear’ from the latter message is ‘Jump on Sally when she visits today” because the mind does not register the word “don’t”.

Clear and loving communication lays the foundation for a successful experience for you and your animal companion.

 

 

You’ll Love This – Man Helps Rescue Ducklings
Friday, May. 17th 2013 10:27 AM

Screen Shot 2013-05-17 at 10_05_08Check out this sweet short video of a man helping to rescue a family of ducklings: http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=9hnbmml8fOY&hd=1

It’s a great feel-good story.

Animal Companion Visits In The Hospital
Saturday, Apr. 20th 2013 1:01 PM

therapy-dog-is-pet-by-an-elderly-man-in-a-wheelchair-and-a-younger-woman-horizontal-shotAs an animal lover, you already know the healing power of having your animal companion near you when you are not feeling well. There is a growing awareness among the medical community that the presence of animal companions assists people in accelerating their healing process. Some hospitals and convalescent homes allow service dogs to visit people during their stay and while this can be very comforting for folks, in addition to uplifting spirits, a visit from one’s own animal companion can be even more healing.

The following article offers some interesting information. http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/10/when-best-friends-can-visit/?src=recg

Here are some additional tips:

(1)  Inquire. Find out if a hospital has a policy about animal companion visitations.

(2) Be persistent. Don’t assume a “No” is the final answer. Speak with the doctor in charge, the hospital administrator, or other persons charged with decision making authority.

(3) Be informed. If the hospital you are dealing with is resistant to the idea, cite other hospitals that have an animal visitation policy in place (see the article referenced above). Be informed about such policies so that you can clearly and convincingly articulate a positive position on the issue. Hospital personnel may be focused on issues such as liability. Be educated on the issue so that you can respond and address their concerns and demonstrate why the benefits outweigh any potential concerns.

(4) Enlist Support. Contact local animal welfare organizations, your vet, or individuals who are actively involved with therapy dogs and ask for their assistance and support. The old adage that it is not what you know but who you know may prove to be very helpful in this situation.

(3) Be an advocate. You can make a difference. Passion and enthusiasm can go a long way in changing the status quo on any issue. Maintain an enthusiastic, respectful and persistent position. Your efforts may make a world of difference in many people’s lives.

 

Posted by Rain Hummingbird | in Animals Healing People |

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The Brilliant And Colorful World Inside Raindrops
Friday, Mar. 15th 2013 1:03 PM

On the cusp of Spring, I thought I’d share these neat photos with you.

Look inside each raindrop. Aren’t these incredible?

Ah! The wonder and magic of nature.

Hope these beauties add some inspiration to your day.

 

 

(more…)

Posted by Rain Hummingbird | in Inspiration for You |

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Dog Chapel in Vermont
Friday, Feb. 15th 2013 10:51 AM

Welcome All Creeds, All Breeds, No Dogmas Allowed.

That’s the message you’ll see at the Dog Chapel on Dog Mountain in St. Johnsbury, Vermont.

The visionary was Stephen Huneck, an artist whose carvings grace the chapel along with stained glass windows with pictures of dogs. The church features a winged labrador on the steeple and the four pews are held up by life-sized carvings of seated dogs.

Messages of love abound and envelope visitors to the chapel offering inspiration for all, whether celebrating the joy of the bond between human and canine or grieving the loss of a beloved dog companion.

The 150 acre mountain-top farm is rich with wildlife and invites visitors to run free, play, swim and explore. It’s always open to the public. Special events are hosted at the Stephen Huneck Gallery on Dog Mountain at various times of the year. For more information, check out their website at dogmt(dot)com.